• Borage

    Borage

    Large plants bear hundreds of small edible flowers, mostly blue and some pink. Mild cucumber flavor for salads and garnishes. Long harvest period. Medicinal: Seed oil is a rich source of gamma-linolenic acid. Avg. 1,500 seeds/oz. Packet: 200 seeds.

    (Borago officinalis ) Cucumber flavored fresh leaves are added to salads, cooked or made into a cooling drink. The blue flowers are used as a garnish. Makes a good honey plant. Also used medicinally. Contains 60 heirloom seeds

    Beautiful periwinkle star-shaped flowers can be used as garnish, to add color to salads, or can be candied! Mild cucumber-like flavor. Annual. 80 DAYS. If the current shipping season is closed, your order will ship at the proper time in the next season.

    Plant this unusual 2-foot annual herb for its pure ornamental value, to attract much-coveted bees to your garden, and to harvest for teas and other summer drinks. Use the small new leaves and the distinctive 1 1/2-inch star-shaped purple-blue flowers in hot and cold drinks, especially teas.Direct sow this annual in full sun. Do not cover seeds, as they need light to germinate. Plants self-sow freely, so you can enjoy more plants next year!Pkt is 100 seeds.

    Borago officinalis The star-like flowers can be frozen in ice for summer drinks, and the flowers and cucumber-flavored leaves are tasty in salads. Borage stays attractive and green long into the fall and readily self-sows for the next season. A favorite of the bees! Germination code: (1)

    (60-70 days) Edible blue star flowers grace soft foliage on htis easy-to-grow companion plant that attracts bees and beneficials.  Use flowers in salads or cakes.

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    Herb, Borage

    Beautiful blue star-shaped flowers hang in clusters. The leaves are covered with stiff white hairs that give the plant a wooly appearance. Bees love the abundant bright flowers, which are great for floating in cool drinks at summer parties. Plants grow 2-3' tall and self-sow readily. Annual. Sow seeds outdoors after the danger of frost has passed. Can also be started indoors 3-4 weeks before last frost. Borage prefers ordinary well-drained soil.